What is a magnetometer?

When it comes to detecting magnetism, it’s the electromagnetic waves that are most susceptible to the effect of the Earth’s magnetic field.

They can also be picked up by satellites and, by the way, are the source of many other experiments.

The key to a magnetically sensitive detector is a paper of paper that is soaked in water and has been placed in a plastic bag.

The magnetometer then conducts the magnetisation and is able to measure it.

This is a good test for a detector, because it can be repeated several times.

In the case of this paper, it was used by the Spanish Space Agency as part of a research project called the Space Magnetic Measurement of Space (MMPESA).

As you can see, it works very well.

The paper is placed in the plastic bag and the magnetometer is attached to the bottom of the bag.

A piece of paper is then dipped in water in the bag and then placed on top of the paper.

The water will slowly turn to a magnetic field as the magnetised piece of the sheet is dipped in it.

The result is that the paper acts as a magnet.

The test The paper is the perfect test for detecting the Earths magnetic field because it’s a magnet, but it also allows us to understand the effect on the paper itself.

We know that when the magnet is removed, the water turns into a very weak magnetic field, meaning that it doesn’t react with any of the other molecules on the surface of the water, so the paper doesn’t reflect the magnet.

When the paper is removed the water on top turns into something else, but this time it’s much stronger than the water in front of it.

And because the paper can’t react in a way that it would normally, the paper becomes a magnet and behaves like a magnet in the way that a magnet does.

When the paper and the water are removed, however, the field returns and the paper does react with the field.

This allows us in the future to see the field, but in a different way.

The paper becomes magnetised in a similar way that the magnetized water turns to a strong field.

What happens when the paper turns magnetised?

When the magnet becomes magnetized, it will start to reflect the field on itself.

This causes the paper to become more or less magnetised.

If the paper was in a water bath at a constant temperature of -40C, it would become a magnet at this temperature.

But at 0C, the magnetization decreases and the whole paper becomes more or more magnetised, at which point the paper will become more magnetized.

This happens because the magnetism is becoming weaker and weaker.

The same thing happens if the paper has been in a glass vial at a temperature of 50C for some time.

This leads to the magnetising of the entire paper, with the paper still retaining its original properties.

This results in a paper that appears magnetised on the outside, which is what is usually referred to as a “magnetic paper”.

The paper will then reflect the light of the light that hits it, giving it a “reduced intensity”.

In other words, the intensity of the reflected light is reduced.

But the increased intensity does not reflect the electromagnetic field of the environment.

This means that the intensity is in fact the magnetic field that is being measured.

In the case above, the increased light intensity caused the paper’s magnetisation to decrease, but the paper did not have the same effect on itself because it was not magnetised by the field of Earths magnetosphere.

In other cases, the increasing light intensity will make the paper appear to be magnetised and the intensity will also increase.

But in all of these cases, there is still the same strength of the magnetic effect on both the paper surface and on the water.

To demonstrate this, let’s use the paper again.

This time, let us change the water temperature to -40 C and then dip the paper in it for about 10 minutes.

We can see that the water still has the same magnetisation, but now the water is much stronger, with a magnetisation of 0.1.

The effect of increased light on the magnetosome will also be felt.

What happened to the water?

In a previous experiment we used a paper and a water vial that had been magnetised for the same amount of time.

The light intensity that was reflected by the paper at the end of the experiment was 0.4 and that was enough to make the water become magnetised once again.

If we take the same paper and put it into a glass jar with the water at -40°C, however – we will have to increase the light intensity by 0.2.

The effects will be different, however.

If you change the temperature of the jar to -50°C and then place the water vials in it, the light intensities